How to create one-page documents to communicate effectively with stakeholders

There are too many examples where business analysts fail to effectively create a shared and common understanding with stakeholders because they failed to understand the information needs of their audience. This article reviews how to analyze the information needs of your stakeholders and provides examples of how to create one-page documents to communicate with them effectively.

As a project team member, we all want to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Reduce waste
  • Create solutions
  • Complete projects on time
  • Improve efficiency
  • Document the right requirements
  • Identify the causes of problems

The question is how do we, as project team members, work with stakeholders to effectively set and manage their expectations? Let’s first review examples of failed outcomes when we have poor communication in our projects:

  • Costly mistakes
  • Poor compliance
  • Failed or delayed audits
  • Inefficiency (people, process, technology)
  • High translation costs
  • Ineffective documentation and/or training
  • Poor quality/best practices
  • Low customer satisfaction/high support costs
  • Lack of standards
  • Incomplete or expensive technology adoption
  • Poor product knowledge

How can we reduce the probability of these poor results on a project? Answer: By improving our communication skills. Let’s start with an overview of the 7 C’s of communication:

    1. Context
    2. Content
    3. Components
    4. Cuts
    5. Composition
    6. Contrast
    7. Consistency

You can improve your communication by thinking about seven “C’s” of communication design: The seven C’s lay out a simple sequence that can help you start broadly and work your way down to specifics.

Here are the seven C’s in order:

 1. Context

What’s going on? Do you understand the situation? Is there an elephant in the room? Ask effective questions. You will need a clear goal before you begin to design any communication. Ask the questions: Who are you talking to, and what do you want them to do?

2. Content

Based on your goal, define a single question that your communication is designed to answer. This is the best possible measure of communication effectiveness. What do you want your audience to walk away with and remember? Once you have defined your key question, answer it. What information is required? Do you have the answer already, or do you need to search for it?

3. Components

Before you build anything, break your content down into basic “building blocks” of content. Formulate the information into clusters and groups. What patterns emerge? How can you make the information modular? Given your goal, what is the most basic unit of information? You can even use index cards to break information down into modules.

4. Cuts

This is one of the most difficult parts of the process and the most often neglected. People’s attention will quickly drift—they expect you to get to the point. Be concise, learn to edit and stay on point.

5. Composition

Now, it is time to design the way you will tell your story. Think of both written and visual composition. When writing, who are your main characters? How will you set the scene? What goals and conflicts will develop? How will the story reach a resolution? In visual terms, where will the reader begin? How will you lead the eye around the page? In all your compositional thinking, how will you engage your audience? How will you keep them engaged? Writing it forces you to think through it.

6. Contrast

What differences matter? Use contrast to highlight them: Big as opposed to little, rough as opposed to smooth, black as opposed to white. When making any point, ask the question, “in comparison with what?” Contrast is a trigger to the brain that says, “Pay attention!”

7. Consistency

Unless you are highlighting differences, keep things such as color, fonts, spacing, and type sizes consistent to avoid distracting people. Any extraneous information detracts from people’s ability to assimilate and learn.

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